Architecture of Scotland Documentary

University of Edinburgh Dorms, Edinburgh ScotlandUniversity of Edinburgh Dorms, Edinburgh ScotlandUniversity of Edinburgh Dorms in Edinburgh Scotland The University of Edinburgh, founded in 1582, is the sixth-oldest university in the English-speaking world and one of Scotland's ancient universities. The university is deeply embedded in the fabric of the city, with many of the buildings in the historic Old Town belonging to the university. National Museum of Scotland, Edinburgh ScotlandNational Museum of Scotland, Edinburgh ScotlandNational Museum Scotland is an executive non-departmental public body of the Scottish Government. It runs the national museums of Scotland. National Museums Scotland is one of the country's National Collections, and holds internationally important collections of natural sciences, decorative arts, world cultures, science and technology, and Scottish history and archaeology. The National Museum is in Edinburgh Scotland The Lighthouse, Glasgow ScotlandThe Lighthouse, Glasgow ScotlandThe Lighthouse in Glasgow is Scotland's Centre for Design and Architecture. It was opened as part of Glasgow's status as UK City of Architecture and Design in 1999. The Lighthouse is the renamed conversion of the former offices of the Glasgow Heraldnewspaper. Completed in 1895, it was designed by the architect Charles Rennie Mackintosh. The centre's vision is to develop the links between design, architecture, and the creative industries, seeing these as interconnected social, educational, economic and cultural issues of concern to everyone. University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh ScotlandUniversity of Edinburgh, Edinburgh ScotlandUniversity of Edinburgh new office building in Edinburgh Scotland. The University of Edinbugh, founded in 1582, is the sixth-oldest university in the English-speaking world and one of Scotland's ancient universities. The university is deeply embedded in the fabric of the city, with many of the buildings in the historic Old Town belonging to the university. Stirling Castle, Stirling ScotlandStirling Castle, Stirling ScotlandStirling Castle, located in Stirling, is one of the largest and most important castles, both historically and architecturally, in Scotland. The castle sits atop Castle Hill, an intrusive crag, which forms part of the Stirling Sill geological formation. It is surrounded on three sides by steep cliffs, giving it a strong defensive position. Its strategic location, guarding what was, until the 1890s, the farthest downstream crossing of the River Forth, has made it an important fortification from the earliest times. Most of the principal buildings of the castle date from the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. A few structures of the fourteenth century remain, while the outer defences fronting the town date from the early eighteenth century. Several Scottish Kings and Queenshave been crowned at Stirling, including Mary, Queen of Scots, in 1542. There have been at least eight sieges of Stirling Castle, including several during the Wars of Scottish Independence, with the last being in 1746, when Bonnie Prince Charlie unsuccessfully tried to take the castle. Stirling Castle is a Scheduled Ancient Monument, and is now a tourist attraction managed by Historic Scotland. Scottish Parliament, Edinburgh ScotlandScottish Parliament, Edinburgh ScotlandThe Scottish Parliament Building is the home of the Scottish Parliament at Holyrood, within the UNESCO World Heritage Site in central Edinburgh. Construction of the building commenced in June 1999 and the Members of the Scottish Parliament held their first debate in the new building on 7 September 2004. The formal opening by Queen Elizabeth took place on 9 October 2004. Enric Miralles, the Catalan architect who designed the building, died before its completion. Metropolitan Cathedral, Glasgow ScotlandMetropolitan Cathedral, Glasgow ScotlandThe Metropolitan Cathedral Church of Saint Andrew is a Roman Catholic Cathedral in the city centre of Glasgow, Scotland. It is the mother church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Glasgow. The Cathedral, which was designed in 1814 by James Gillespie Graham in the Neo Gothic style, lies on the north bank of the River Clyde in Clyde Street. St Andrew's Cathedral is the seat of the Archbishop of Glasgow, currently the Most Reverend Philip Tartaglia. It is dedicated to the patron saint of Scotland, Saint Andrew. Old University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh ScotlandOld University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh ScotlandThe Old University of Edinburgh in Edinburgh Scotland. The University of Edinburgh, founded in 1582, is the sixth-oldest university in the English-speaking world and one of Scotland's ancient universities. The university is deeply embedded in the fabric of the city, with many of the buildings in the historic Old Town belonging to the university. Falkirk Wheel, Falkirk ScotlandFalkirk Wheel, Falkirk ScotlandThe Falkirk Wheel is a rotating boat lift in Scotland, connecting the Forth and Clyde Canal with the Union Canal. The lift, named after the nearby town of Falkirk in central Scotland, opened in 2002. It reconnects the two canals for the first time since the 1930s as part of the Millennium Link project. The plan to regenerate central Scotland's canals and reconnect Glasgow with Edinburgh was led by British Waterways with support and funding from seven local authorities, the Scottish Enterprise Network, the European Regional Development Fund, and the Millennium Commission. Planners decided early on to create a dramatic 21st-century landmark structure to reconnect the canals, instead of simply recreating the historic lock flight. The wheel raises boats by 79 ft, but the Union Canal is still 36 ft higher than the aqueduct which meets the wheel. Boats must also pass through a pair of locks between the top of the wheel and the Union Canal. The Falkirk Wheel is the only rotating boat lift of its kind in the world, and one of two boat lifts in the United Kingdom, the other being the Anderton boat lift. The Hub, Edinburgh ScotlandThe Hub, Edinburgh ScotlandThe Hub, at the top of Edinburgh's Royal Mile, is the home of the Edinburgh International Festival, and a central source of information on all the Edinburgh Festivals. Its gothic spire - the highest point in central Edinburgh - towers over the surrounding buildings below the castle. The building design was the result of a collaboration between Edinburgh architect J Gillespie Graham and the famous gothic revivalist Augustus Pugin. It was constructed between 1842 and 1845. The inside houses the Hub Cafe; Hub Tickets, the central box office for the International Festival, which also sells tickets for a wide range of other events; a Main Hall with a capacity of 420, used as a venue for concerts and so on; and two smaller venues, the Glass Room and the Dunard Library, suitable for smaller events. Prior to the completion of the new Scottish Parliament Building at Holyrood in 2004, the Hub was occasionally used for meetings of the Scottish Parliament when the Church of Scotland's General Assembly Hall was unavailable. The Parliament returned to the Hub for two weeks following the collapse of a beam in its debating chamber on 2 March 2006. Dugald Stewart Monument, Edinburgh ScotlandDugald Stewart Monument, Edinburgh ScotlandThe Dugald Stewart Monument is a memorial to the Scottish philosopher Dugald Stewart (1753–1828). It is situated on Calton Hill overlooking Edinburgh city centre and was completed in August 1831. Dugald Stewart was a professor at the University of Edinburgh, holding the chair of moral philosophy from 1786 until his death. The Royal Society of Edinburgh commissioned the monument and selected its site in 1830. The monument is modeled on the Choragic Monument of Lysicrates in Athens, Greece and is a circular temple of 9 fluted Corinthian columns around an elevated urn. This example of the architecture of ancient Greece had been brought to wider attention by James "Athenian" Stuart and Nicholas Revett's illustrated survey, The Antiquities of Athens, published in 1762. The Choragic Monument also provided the model for the nearby Robert Burns Monument, designed by Thomas Hamilton around the same time. The monument forms part of a collection of Greek Revival architecture in the area, including the National Monument and the former Royal High School building. The monument is a category A listed building as of 19 April 1966. The Dugald Stewart Monument was designed by William Henry Playfair, who was also responsible for the elegant thoroughfare that encircles Calton Hill on three sides, comprising Royal Terrace, Carlton Terrace and Regent Terrace. Playfair also designed the nearby Scottish National Monument. Clyde Auditorium, Glasgow ScotlandClyde Auditorium, Glasgow ScotlandThe Clyde Auditorium, familiarly known as "The Armadillo", is a concert venue and auditorium in Glasgow, Scotland. The building sits on the site of the now infilled Queen's Dock on the River Clyde, adjacent to the Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre. Scottish Parliament, Edinburgh ScotlandScottish Parliament, Edinburgh ScotlandThe Scottish Parliament Building is the home of the Scottish Parliament at Holyrood, within the UNESCO World Heritage Site in central Edinburgh. Construction of the building commenced in June 1999 and the Members of the Scottish Parliament held their first debate in the new building on 7 September 2004. The formal opening by Queen Elizabeth took place on 9 October 2004. Enric Miralles, the Catalan architect who designed the building, died before its completion. National Monument of Scotland, Edinburgh ScotlandNational Monument of Scotland, Edinburgh ScotlandThe National Monument of Scotland on Calton Hill in Edinburgh, is Scotland's national memorial to the Scottish soldiers and sailors who died fighting in the Napoleonic Wars. It was intended, according to the inscription, to be "A Memorial of the Past and Incentive to the Future Heroism of the Men of Scotland". The monument dominates the top of Calton Hill, just to the east of Princes Street. It was designed during 1823-6 by Charles Robert Cockerell and William Henry Playfair and is modelled upon the Parthenon in Athens. Construction started in 1826 and, due to the lack of funds, was left unfinished in 1829. This circumstance gave rise to various nicknames such as "Scotland's Disgrace", "Edinburgh's Disgrace", "the Pride and Poverty of Scotland" and "Edinburgh's Folly". Kelpies, Falkirk ScotlandKelpies, Falkirk ScotlandThe Kelpies are 30-metre high horse-head sculptures, standing next to a new extension to the Forth and Clyde Canal, and near River Carron, in The Helix, a new parkland project built to connect 16 communities in the Falkirk Council Area, Scotland. The sculptures were designed by sculptor Andy Scott and were completed in October 2013. The sculptures form a gateway at the eastern entrance to the Forth and Clyde canal, and the new canal extension built as part of The Helix land transformation project. The Kelpies are a monument to horse powered heritage across Scotland. The sculptures opened to the public in April 2014. As part of the project, they will have their own visitor centre, and sit beside a newly developed canal turning pool and extension. This canal extension reconnects the Forth and Clyde Canal with the River Forth, and improves navigation between the East and West of Scotland. The Riverside Museum, Glasgow ScotlandThe Riverside Museum, Glasgow ScotlandThe Riverside Museum is a new development for the Glasgow Museum of Transport, completed on 20 June 2011, at Pointhouse Quay in the Glasgow Harbourregeneration district of Glasgow, Scotland. The next day it opened to the public. On 18 May 2013, the museum was announced as the Winner of the 2013 European Museum of the Year Award. In 2013, the museum had 740,276 visitors during the year. Scottish Parliament, Edinburgh ScotlandScottish Parliament, Edinburgh ScotlandThe Scottish Parliament Building is the home of the Scottish Parliament at Holyrood, within the UNESCO World Heritage Site in central Edinburgh. Construction of the building commenced in June 1999 and the Members of the Scottish Parliament held their first debate in the new building on 7 September 2004. The formal opening by Queen Elizabeth took place on 9 October 2004. Enric Miralles, the Catalan architect who designed the building, died before its completion. SSE Hydro, Glasgow ScotlandSSE Hydro, Glasgow ScotlandThe SSE Hydro is an arena located in Glasgow, Scotland, on the site of the Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre (SECC). The arena has a capacity of 13,000. The arena officially opened on 30 September 2013, with a concert by Rod Stewart. It was designed by the London-based architects Foster + Partners and named after SSE plc. The SSE Hydro handled 1,045,344 ticket sales in 2014, making it the second-busiest music arena in the world in terms of ticket sales, behind only London's The O2 Arena. This makes the arena busier than Manchester's Manchester Arena and the famous Madison Square Garden in New York. Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Glasgow ScotlandKelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Glasgow ScotlandThe Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum is a museum and art gallery in Glasgow, Scotland. Since its 2003–06 refurbishment, the museum has been the most popular free-to-enter visitor attraction in Scotland, and the most visited museum in the United Kingdom outside London. The gallery is located on Argyle Street, in the West End of the city, on the banks of the River Kelvin (opposite the architecturally similar Kelvin Hall, which was built in matching style in the 1920s, after the previous hall had been destroyed by fire). It is adjacent to Kelvingrove Park and is situated near the main campus of the University of Glasgow on Gilmorehill.